Metro-Surfing and Integrity

Metro Surfing and Integrity In accord with my boredom practice, I spent a week riding the New York City subways without the blessing of books or podcasts. This forced me to observe only my surroundings. It’s a good thing there are so many interesting things to observe on the trains. One of my favorite things to do on a train is watch the train car in front of me. It’s very handy for “train surfing”: the practice of standing without holding on to anything, trying not to fall over or lose your balance. This is often a very difficult task, as the trains sometimes take very dramatic turns and practically always start and stop at a drastic pace. Of course, I’ve found a workaround. If I watch the car in front of me, I can predict whether the train is suddenly turning left or right. It’s simple: As soon as I see the next car jerk to the left, I lean to my left. If it jerks to the right, I lean to my right. I like to think it makes me look like a pro on the subway. But there’s something else that I learned years ago about watching the car in front of me. Something very strange unless you realize what’s going on. The next car always looks MUCH more shaky than the one I’m in. Every train car shakes around a bit as it moves. The tracks aren’t perfectly smooth, and I can feel a slight bouncing all the time. But the train car in front of me always looks twice as shaky and bouncy as...